How to Find the Distance to a Jump, Part 2

Look beyond the jump you are approaching. Journal photo  From The American Quarter Horse Journal Look beyond the jump you are approaching. Journal photo From The American Quarter Horse Journal

February 13, 2018

How to Find the Distance to a Jump, Part 2

Top professionals share horse-training tips for riding accurately to jumps.
From The American Quarter Horse Journal
Note: This is Part 2 of a two-part series. If you missed the first installment, read How to Find a Distance to a Jump, Part 1.
Visualize

David Connors, trainer and coach of multiple world champions and AQHA Superhorses, teaches visualization as a pre-game warm-up.

“First, I tell my students to visualize the course and the approach they will take to the first jump,” says David, of Colts Neck, New Jersey.
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Maintain Rhythm 

David Warner of Alto, Michigan, stresses rhythm as the key ingredient of a successful ride. “When people start worrying too much about seeing a distance instead of riding a rhythm, it makes things more complicated,” he says. “If you keep your horse on the correct, 12-foot rhythm, you’re not going to get the perfect distance every time, but you ride the distance you’ve got."
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Keep Coming

Shane George, world champion rider, coach and AQHA judge of Magnolia, Texas, stresses working forward out of the turns.

“The biggest thing I can say is, make sure you have your horse in front of you through the turn,” Shane says. “Do not be taking back and backpedaling. The tighter the turn, the more leg you should hold on your horse. If you allow things to change too much, you will have more trouble seeing a distance.”
Continue reading about jumping distances at AQHA Daily.