How to Be Good Turnback Help, Part 1

Great turnback people are like good cutting horses – both need keen intuitive powers when responding to situations and cattle. Journal photo Great turnback people are like good cutting horses – both need keen intuitive powers when responding to situations and cattle. Journal photo

February 27, 2018

How to Be Good Turnback Help, Part 1

In this horse-training tip, pros share what separates the best cutting and reined cow horse turnback help from the rest.

From The American Quarter Horse Journal
Great herd help, both turning back and in the corners, must have the ability to scan and react to any situation in the cutting pen. They are also able to evaluate the cutter, his horse and read cattle with a sixth sense.

Earning respect as “great turnback help” takes a little natural aptitude and a lot of experience. Paying attention and being aware of the overall pen scene is optimum.
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Pay Attention 

To help turn back or work the corner during a cutting, you must be mounted on a good horse, make yourself available and always pay attention, Russ says. Manpower is in demand during those long days, with the best helpers spending long, hard hours in the saddle. Knowing what it takes to be useful turnback help will also help you find the best help when it is your turn to cut.

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Paying attention to the many unscripted movements during a run is very important to people working outside the herd, too. Even when just practicing at home, turnback help should keep the run moving at a reasonable pace without letting the action cease.
To read more about good turnback help, go to AQHA Daily.